Utility Permits and Construction Road Closure Requests

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When is a utility permit required?

A Utility permit is required for construction work in the right-of-way which generally coincides with installation of fiber cable, water or sewer line. Utility permits are also used for lane closures that coincide with construction, tree removal, or some other type of road construction.

When is a utility permit not required?

  • A Utility Permit is not needed when a residential builder is connecting to an existing water meter, gas service, or sewer connection.
  • A Utility Permit is not needed when a contractor is accessing utility infrastructure in an easement on private property.

Who can apply for a utility permit?

A permit can be obtained by licensed contractor or the property owner. In order for the property owner to obtain a permit, the property must be their current permanent residence.

What about commercial property owners? Generally the contractor performing the work will apply for the permit.

Applying for a utility permit

To apply for a permit, please visit the construction permit desk located at the “Zoning and Permitting” entrance on the south side of City Hall. Utility permits require a formal review with a maximum turn-around time of approximately 15 business days.

To apply electronically, please email (Antoinette’s email). If submitting construction drawings, three copies are necessary.

Licensed Contractors: Please bring your business license and state issued ID (e.g. driver’s license).

Permit Fees

In Sandy Springs, the fee for a permit is based on the linear foot of installation regarding fiber cable, wire, or piping with a minimum of $275.00 due per application and a flat fee of $425.00 for water or sewer installation. To find out how much the permit will cost, please view our permit fee schedule

Application Requirements

Pay special attention to three main areas of focus when creating a Utility Permit Application.

  1. Methodology – explain what you’re doing and how you’re doing it in the ‘Description Field.’ For example – ‘directional boring 44’ to provide a natural gas connection for a new residence. We will dig a tie-in pit at the location shown on the drawing, and exit the ROW as shown.’ The better your description of the work is, the quicker it can be processed.
  2. Traffic Control – include a Traffic Control Plan that adheres to MUTCD standards. This should be included in the submittal packet. A copy of the typical application you’ve chosen will suffice.
  3. Restoration – list all items in the ROW that will be disturbed along with their current condition. Detail how you will restore them to like or better conditions.

*Be aware that city-owned Fiber cables are not in the GA 811 Utility Locate System. The Contractor must pothole for fiber before excavation begins.

Please click on the link below for a map of where City Fiber is located.

The Utility Permit Application is on page 16 of the Utility Permit Policy

Lane Closure Requests

Pay special attention to these main areas of focus when creating a Utility Permit Application for a Lane Closure.

  1. Methodology – explain exactly what action you’re performing and why it requires a lane closure. 
  2. Traffic Control – include a Traffic Control Plan that adheres to MUTCD standards. Call out the Typical Application number you’re citing and customize your specific street plan to those requirements.
  3. Schedule – The City requires a 30-day notice when applying for a lane closure. After final approval, there is a five business day waiting period for resident outreach. Please list the exact schedule dates you are requesting.
  4. Restoration – list all items in the ROW that will be disturbed along with their current condition. Detail how you will restore them to like or better conditions.

Utility Signage Template

The City has prepared a template for Notice of Utility Work signage required when work area involves more than 500 feet. 

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